shake the dust off one’s feet; shake the dust from one’s feet

to leave a place in anger; to get away from a bad situation
—Tom was angry that no one in his home town would hire him, so he shook the dust off his feet and moved on.

Jesus sent his 12 disciples to the towns in groups of two. He gave them several instructions, including,

Whenever you enter a town or village, find out who is worthy there and stay with them until you leave. As you enter the house, give it greetings. And if the house is worthy, let your peace come on it, but if it is not worthy, let your peace return to you. And if anyone will not welcome you or listen to your message, shake the dust off your feet [shake off the dust of your feet] as you leave that house or that town. (Matthew 10:11-14)

Later, when he sent out a larger group of 70 followers, he told them that if they were unwelcome in a city, they should

go into its streets and say, “Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet we wipe off against you [the very dust of your city, which cleaveth on us, we do wipe off against you]. Nevertheless know this: The kingdom of God has come.” (Luke 10:10,11)

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