no man can serve two masters

it is impossible to pursue two goals that oppose each other
—My friend wants to move to Hollywood to become a famous pop singer, but he also wants to keep his small-town values. I don’t think he can do both. No man can serve two masters.

While teaching about wealth and possessions, Jesus said,

No one can serve two masters [No man can serve two masters], for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money [mammon]. (Matthew 6:24)

Mammon comes from an Aramaic word meaning “riches.” (Aramaic was the common language of the Jewish people in Jesus’ day.) Today, mammon means “wealth that causes corruption.”

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