land flowing with milk and honey; land of milk and honey

a place giving an abundance of good things
—Many people who move to the city thinking it is a land flowing with milk and honey soon realize that good-paying jobs are hard to find.

While speaking to Moses from the burning bush, God told him to return to Egypt to lead his people back to the Promised Land. He called it “a land flowing with milk and honey” because of the great amount of food and other blessings he would provide for them there. God said,

I have surely seen the affliction of my people who are in Egypt. I have heard their cry because of their taskmasters, for I know their sorrows. I have come down to deliver them from the hand of the Egyptians and to bring them up from that land to a land that is both good and spacious, to a land flowing with milk and honey, to the region of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites. (Exodus 3:7,8)

When Moses asked God what his name was, God called himself “I am.” Then he used a name for himself that comes from the Hebrew for to be, meaning something like “the one who always is.” Today this name is often pronounced as Jehovah (based on the Hebrew spelling), but it is shown in most English Bibles as the LORD (or the Lord):

God said to Moses, “I am that I am.” And he said, “You must say this to the Israelites, ‘I am has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “You must say this to the Israelites, ‘The Lord—the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob—has sent me to you. (Exodus 3:14,15)

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