forbidden fruit 

something that becomes more appealing because it is immoral or not permitted
—Laura knew that dating a coworker was not allowed, but that meant that Alan was forbidden fruit and she wanted to be with him even more.

After God created man and woman, Eve joined Adam in the special garden God had made:

The Lord God planted an orchard in the east, in Eden; and there he placed the man he had formed. The Lord God made all kinds of trees grow from the soil, every tree that was pleasing to look at and good for food. (Now the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil were in the middle of the orchard.) . . .

The Lord God took the man and placed him in the orchard in Eden [garden of Eden—KJV] to care for it and to maintain it. Then the Lord God commanded the man, “You may freely eat fruit from every tree of the orchard, but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will surely die.” (Genesis 2:8,9,15-17)

The Garden of Eden was a wonderful place, a paradise. Today, a beautiful, unspoiled, peaceful place or situation can be called “Eden” or “Edenic.”

The phrase forbidden fruit tastes the sweetest means that “when a person knows he should not do something, he wants to do it even more.”

In the Book of Proverbs we read about “wisdom” and “folly,” which are like two women who call out to those who pass by. Folly is a foolish woman who sits in her doorway, trying to lure people into her home, saying,

Stolen waters are sweet,
and food obtained in secret is pleasant! (Proverbs 9:17)

The forbidden fruit that Adam and Eve ate is often thought to have been an apple (though the Bible doesn’t say what kind of fruit it was). There is a story—not from the Bible—that says that the piece of fruit Adam ate got stuck as he swallowed it. Therefore, the bump on a person’s throat—it sticks out farther on men—is called an Adam’s apple.

 

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