filthy lucre; lucre

money, especially when gained dishonestly ora as the result of greed
—If you’re addicted to filthy lucre, you’ll stop at nothing to get more.

The Latin word lucrum, from which lucre comes, simply means “material gain or profits.” But because of the problems it can create, money is often seen negatively, and lucre has come to signify money gotten in the wrong way or for selfish reasons. This is in large part due to the translation of dishonest gain as filthy lucre in the Book of Titus, in which Paul writes about “unruly and vain talkers and deceivers”

who must be silenced because they mislead whole families by teaching for dishonest gain [filthy lucre’s sake] what ought not to be taught. (Titus 1:11)

This usage of filthy has also carried over into describing someone who is extremely wealthy as filthy rich.

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