cast pearls before swine; pearls before swine

to present something precious or sophisticated to someone who is unable to appreciate it
—It would be a waste of time to show your invention to the company’s board of directors. They’re so close-minded, it would be casting pearls before swine.

Jesus told his disciples not to present his teachings to those who were openly hostile towards them or who were unable to listen. He instructed them,

Do not give what is holy to dogs or throw your pearls before  pigs [cast ye your pearls before swine]; otherwise they will trample them under their feet and turn around and tear you to pieces. (Matthew 7:6)

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