nimrod

idiot, fool
—He couldn’t even find his way home from the bus station. What a nimrod!

Noah had three sons named Shem, Ham, and Japheth. The Bible contains lists of their descendants, including Cush, a son of Ham:

Cush was the father of Nimrod; he began to be a valiant warrior on the earth. He was a mighty hunter before the Lord. (That is why it is said, “Like Nimrod, a mighty hunter before the Lord.”)

In English, nimrod first meant “hunter,” but now most people don’t remember its positive meaning and it is more often used as an insult.

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